Is it true that negative feedback is bad? There has been much interest over the years into the impact of feedback and in particular the value of positive feedback versus negative feedback. Much of the recent commentary is that positive feedback is better for engagement and learning and that negative feedback discourages learning and lowers engagement.  Many organisations run l ...

The evidence and research is clear, mental health concerns in adolescents is on the rise.  One of the key reasons is our over-protective parenting. In particular, the use of participation certificates, or not keeping score on a football game, which are both examples where we are letting our children down by not giving them the opportunity to develop resilience.  We need to change our mindsets and understanding about how to build resilience in our children.

The latest research tells us that extroverts are more likely to get promoted, more likely to get opportunities, get paid more, perceived as more credible, and more likely to be seen as a visible leader. If this is the case, does that now mean that as Introverts we need to accept that we might not be given the opportunity, or the visibility or credibility?

I think that what concerns me most is that as Introverts we then justify events or explain our lack of visibility or impact by the fact the we are an Introvert.  In other words, we are using introversion as an excuse.

The latest evidence and research tell us that organisations that have employees that have high levels of well-being, are more engaged and more passionate about their work. Employees that are more engaged and more passionate about their work then deliver better outcomes as individuals within the organisation, which then delivers better organisational outcomes. The majority (90 ...

Developing the resilience of our children and the mindset to Get Back Up is critical for their future success.  In the series of Get Back Up videos we share the key strategies and tips to cultivate resilient children.

We need to understand how to get better at supporting and managing mental health in the workplace.  In this video we talk about a framework that assists leaders, team members and ourselves to understand what impacts on mental health outcomes in the workplace and a couple of key strategies for improving how we better support people around us who might be experiencing some mental health concerns.

Whatever we pay attention to reflects what we think is important.  More importantly, when we are communicating or being with others, their perception of what we pay attention to then reinforces the respective behaviours.

We all have many choices to make in our lives, many of which seem inconsequential at the time but in hindsight are pretty significant.  I notice that in many cases we experience significant, and sometimes debilitating emotions surrounding choices, which results in us getting stuck in indecision.  If we focus on the past following a decision, we can be overwhelmed by guilt, resentment, regret, and sadness.  On the other hand, if we focus on the future, we become anxious and fearful, which often results in us either procrastinating or coming up with reasons why we shouldn't make the decision.