Is it true that negative feedback is bad? There has been much interest over the years into the impact of feedback and in particular the value of positive feedback versus negative feedback. Much of the recent commentary is that positive feedback is better for engagement and learning and that negative feedback discourages learning and lowers engagement.  Many organisations run l ...

The latest research tells us that extroverts are more likely to get promoted, more likely to get opportunities, get paid more, perceived as more credible, and more likely to be seen as a visible leader. If this is the case, does that now mean that as Introverts we need to accept that we might not be given the opportunity, or the visibility or credibility?

I think that what concerns me most is that as Introverts we then justify events or explain our lack of visibility or impact by the fact the we are an Introvert.  In other words, we are using introversion as an excuse.

The latest evidence and research tell us that organisations that have employees that have high levels of well-being, are more engaged and more passionate about their work. Employees that are more engaged and more passionate about their work then deliver better outcomes as individuals within the organisation, which then delivers better organisational outcomes. The majority (90 ...

Whatever we pay attention to reflects what we think is important.  More importantly, when we are communicating or being with others, their perception of what we pay attention to then reinforces the respective behaviours.

We all have many choices to make in our lives, many of which seem inconsequential at the time but in hindsight are pretty significant.  I notice that in many cases we experience significant, and sometimes debilitating emotions surrounding choices, which results in us getting stuck in indecision.  If we focus on the past following a decision, we can be overwhelmed by guilt, resentment, regret, and sadness.  On the other hand, if we focus on the future, we become anxious and fearful, which often results in us either procrastinating or coming up with reasons why we shouldn't make the decision.

We have been fascinated about teams and what is required to reach and sustain a high-performance state.  Having worked with a multitude of teams in different settings and environments, we have further confirmed the validity of our high performing elite teams (HPET®) model and framework.  I share below twelve questions that you can use to assess the effectiveness of your team.

We have this faulty belief that if I provide positive feedback and encouragement I will be able to shift this person to high performance.  Further, we believe that if we do need to give negative feedback, that we need to sandwich the negative feedback between two sets of positive feedback i.e. the feedback sandwich. Lastly, we believe that if we provide negative feedback that we will reduce motivation and cause poorer performance. We have got feedback completely wrong.  Our beliefs couldn’t be more incorrect.

At some point in a Leader’s life they will need to manage someone with an Attitude Problem. This is can be a difficult and challenging process and many Leaders feel unskilled in how to manage this situation.

The more we accept the ‘Elephant in the Room’ the more we renovate the room around the elephant, until the elephant grows so large that the elephant is no longer able to exit the room.  It is at this point that we have an ‘Elephant’ sized problem that we are unable to resolve. We need to STOP renovating around the Elephant, and instead start addressing the ‘Elephant in the Room’.  We need to have the courage to speak up in a respectful but direct manner and simply make an observation of the Elephant.