Over our many years of experience we have learnt a great deal about ourselves and others.  We share below our insights and views.  We trust that you will enjoy reading our Blog and encourage you to contribute your thoughts and views too.

In the context of the 2021 World Mental Health day and the increasing importance for organisations and leaders to be leading and managing well-being in the workplace more effectively, there are a couple of statements that I hear leaders use over and over again that completely undermine all the work we are doing around mental well-being.

There is a lot of discussion right now about 'Psychological Safety' - the latest buzz word (again).  Unfortunately, there is significant misunderstanding and misinterpretation of this concept of 'Psychological Safety', which is doing more harm than good.  In particular, there is a misconception that Psychological Safety means that people shouldn't be made to feel uncomfortable and shouldn't experience negative emotions.  As a Psychologist having worked with individuals, teams and organisations for over 20 years, this view of psychological safety in my experience creates significantly more long term distress and negative impact for both the individuals and the organisation.

In this short video Greg discusses how important it is to assess our relationship with feedback i.e. our self-talk about feedback, particularly as a leader.

Greg Bayne talking about how leaders can significantly increase their impact through vulnerability.

An summary of the interview with Greg Bayne about the concept of Allostasis and the rapid adaptation to change.

We need to urgently and proactively enhance well-being.  We need to start with ourselves and our children.  This article outlines 5 steps to cultivate well-being in ourselves and secondly to reflect on how we can better cultivate well-being and resilience in our children.

We have this faulty belief that if I provide positive feedback and encouragement I will be able to shift this person to high performance.  Further, we believe that if we do need to give negative feedback, that we need to sandwich the negative feedback between two sets of positive feedback i.e. the feedback sandwich. Lastly, we believe that if we provide negative feedback that we will reduce motivation and cause poorer performance. We have got feedback completely wrong.  Our beliefs couldn’t be more incorrect.

At some point in a Leader’s life they will need to manage someone with an Attitude Problem. This is can be a difficult and challenging process and many Leaders feel unskilled in how to manage this situation.